Saturday, July 07, 2012

A GOP Divided Cannot Stand

Erick RedNeck .................................................................. Between the Tea Party and the M's and B's is an abyss that can no longer be spanned. For a quarter century the leadership of the GOP has consistently let languish, worse, downright betrayed, the principles and concerns which guide and motivate its body. Versailles has enjoyed its long sucker punching of the American right. But there is no more time for this shit. The GOP regains its lost integrity, or it dies. That simple, and that immediate. "Put bluntly, Republicans voted to do exactly what they they accuse the Democrats of doing — shut down businesses by driving up regulatory burdens in an effort to increase taxes...............Republican leaders in Washington ..... have become less and less like the Party of Reagan and more and more like the Party of John Anderson. "

20 comments:

Tecumseh said...

Erik the RedNeck is not happy with the wheeler-dealer GOPers. I feel his pain. But what to do about that, besides cry and drink?

Charly said...

Except the divisive element in the GOP IS the tea party, which the republican electorate has unequivocally turned its back on during the primaries.
For republicans (and dems) there is no oxygen away from the middle.

Arelcao Akleos said...

Charly, it is hard to say anymore what with you is blissful ignorance and what is a conscious decision to treat facts as a prelude to your private fantasia, but the "republican electorate" has not turned its back on the tea party candidates in the primaries. Those who were supported by the Tea Party consistently compiled a majority of the votes cast. The Tea Party chose not to support a single candidate, but to encourage its adherents to support those who they individually believed to give Tea Party principles their best shot in the GOP.
Given Romney become the sack into which all the establishment poured its support, this was a strategic mistake, of course. When that RWN Reagan ran against the House of Bush, in 1980. the same cultural elements that support the Tea Party today were coalesced around the single figure of Reagan. But the Tea Party was fashioned not as the platform for electing one particular figure, but as a movement to keep the GOP, the default party of the right out of the sheer brute fact there ain't any way a major party could go to the left of the Dems, as an instrument for the Constitution, for our free Republic, and for the preservation of individual liberty against the rising power of the Leviathan State. Whatever spine the GOP has shown the last few years has come directly from the pressure of the Tea Party, and at the congressional and state level it has far surpassed in achievement what the establishment types have been doing.

Arelcao Akleos said...

"the divisive element in the GOP IS the tea party"

Charly talking about the Republican electorate is a most farcical thing. Akin to NASA becoming a Muslim Feel Good club, or Chris Mathews trying to parse the Lincoln-Douglas debates, or Obama taking a course in Heat Transfer.

Certainly, to the House of Bush, Reagan was a figure that divided the GOP. Because to have an alternative to the right of the Toryesque me-too-ism espoused by the "Rockefeller" Republicans was certainly undermining the authority of the Establishment. Hence Bush's vitriolic campaign against Reagan.
In the end, it was Reagan who was the great uniter, and saved the Establishment from its own stupidities. But when it had the chance for a do-over, with Elder Bush, it turned out it had learnt nothing from its past folly, and has sought to eradicate Reaganism as living force inside the GOP [of which Gingrich in '94 was the last big wave....until the Tea Party]
Groovy Charly; you and Bush as Versaillean birds of a feather.
But you do understand, don't you, that nothing quite divides the people from their Versaillean overlords quite as much as that Aristocratic lusting for Fucking it all up? You, and Karl Rove, and Mama Bush, and Andrew Sullivan, and the Frum-ious Brooker-snatch, etc..., can rail against those Stinking Peasants all you want, but the problem is a leadership divided from the people and now habituated to consider the citizens of this nation as no more than fodder for whatever madness results from the dreamworld of Versailles.
The fight between the Tea Party and the Establishment in the GOP is just the latest, and probably last, round of this half century war for the soul of the party. You, of course,as long as your champagne flows untroubled in Versailles, find all this stinking peasant stuff such a bother, so declasse'. But, to us Rubes out here in the ever expanding wasteland, it's Versailles itself that is the fundamental problem.

The GOP cannot be Versaillean and for a free Republic at the same time, and so it is divided against itself. You hope that the silly free Republic thing just dies, or submits to Versailles, so that Versailles can revel in its own glory.
But that tells us all about Charly, and not the role the Tea Party is playing in the history of the GOP.

Arelcao Akleos said...

"For republicans (and dems) there is no oxygen away from the middle."

Complete drivel. Try to breathe that one in, and you will asphyxiate, Charly.
The USA is in an existential moment where it is caught between its past ideal of a constitutional republic of individual liberty or the dream of a Socialist State to rule them all. In the middle the oxygen is consumed by the fires between. AmeriSoc knows its fighting for that Socialist State, and the Tea Party knows its fighting for that Constitutional Republic.
What does the Establishment GOP fight for?

Tecumseh said...

AA: I'm not sure where you fit Kraut in all of this (sometimes he's hard to pin down), but here he makes a lot of sense. Maybe he's sort of saying the same thing, but more smoothly, so it sounds better on TV.

At any rate, Mitt better wakes up, or else we'll have a reprise of MacRotter, circa Fall 2008.

Tecumseh said...

Some frank talk from an establishmentarian GOPper.

Arelcao Akleos said...

No, there is no need of Love. But there is a powerful need to be convinced that Romney, should he win, will not be the Presidential equivalent of Roberts.
Given the record of Establishment Republicans the last decades there is every reason to have grave doubts, and given Romney's track record there is every reason for him to be moving mountains to ease those doubts.
So far, he's just slapping piles of sand from the right to the left to the right to the left of his table.

Tecumseh said...

Yep. That's about right, sadly enough. The Roberts double-crosshas left a sour taste in the mouth. Somehow, it has also affected negatively Romney, for a variety of reasons.

Life is a bitch.

Arelcao Akleos said...

I think it hurts Romney because many figure that he doesn't have the cojones to fight, through Congress, for a repeal of Obamacare.....but that if the Supreme Court had judged against it then Romney and the Repubs would have definitely not revived that monstrosity.
The decision puts more pressure, more responsibility, on Romney and on his strength as well as his strength of character, should he win the election.
And that's where doubt hits very very hard.

Charly said...

That the republican electorate turned its back on the Tea Party is hardly a matter of debate: each TP-leaning candidate that was given a shot was rejected - in quick succession.

What the TP did well was to turn lack of party discipline to its advantage with countless debates to showcase the candidates. Voters were able to visualize a number of presidential outfits on TP ideology and rejected them one after the other. You want a bible-thumping soccer mom? Barry White's suave younger cousin? Ok how about a hat-wearing cowboy? No problem. What about a fatuous professor pompous enough for Versailles ? Alright how about... ?
This wasn't a situation where the electorate had one day to make a decision among many candidates: there was very much one TP-man at the bat at a time in as orderly a sequence as election dynamics permit, and the last one standing went down like the others.

As a matter of fact, voters disapproved of TP candidates to such an extent that they preferred to go for the guy everyone just sort of disliked. After fucking everyone on the football team, the prom queen elopes with the home economics teacher. Fun is ok, but that ain't what marriage is all about.

As the day of reckoning neared and it came down to the question as to which of these candidates had a serious shot at the larger ticket, which of them represented the ideals of anyone beyond those of their own idiosyncratic microcosm, no one fit the shoes. Who outside of the TP would consider a Santorum presidency? Besides Jon Stewart, that is.

Arelcao Akleos said...

"That the republican electorate turned its back on the Tea Party is hardly a matter of debate: each TP-leaning candidate that was given a shot was rejected - in quick succession. "

Charly, splitting the field amongst those inclined to Tea Party views, with the sum of these being consistently in the majority, is the republican electorate turning its back on the Tea Party? Uh huh. Irony is definitely thicker with a huge dollop of obtuseness.

Your first paragraph's muck is a good enough send off into sleep. I'll plow through the remainder when I awake.

Charly said...

"The US is caught between its past ideal of a constitutional republic of individual liberty or the dream of a Socialist State to rule them all"

Presented under this bias the choice is obvious. But the more realistic perspective is that of a US caught between a return to austere small-town conformism as prosaic as it is antiquated, and a vibrant modern society with eyes open to the world and freedom relating to all facets of an individual's life.

Socialist ideology has long disappeared in the US. Kucinich & McMillan are about as electable as Perry, and that is fortunate for all of us.

Mr roT said...

A US returning to austere small-town conformism is better than one turning to a campy Cambridge, MA with no opera house.

Charly said...

Why - are there no whorehouses in Cambridge either ?

Mr roT said...

Just Harvard.

Tecumseh said...

Powww!!! Mr Rot wakes up.

Mr roT said...

Thx, Tecs.

Arelcao Akleos said...

"But the more realistic perspective is that of a US caught between a return to austere small-town conformism as prosaic as it is antiquated, and a vibrant modern society with eyes open to the world and freedom relating to all facets of an individual's life".


The condensation of falsehood and opium laden fantasy in the above is so dense it would make Bose's most fervent acolytes doubt their Master in comparison to Charly. It is good that it is just Charles exercising his famous penchant for l'Ironie when the notion of having to think through what he really understands of the world threatens to become irksome. Irony Charles allows for a quick getaway back to Kayla and Champagne, which after all is the sort of "perk" most Aristos prefer.

Still, Irony Charly, while the true Bleu you enjoys that Perignon, let me just point out that as soon as you saw what that "vibrant modern society with eyes open to the world and freedom relating to all facets of an individual's life" a'bornin' you ran as quick as your silver clad feet could carry you out of the country. You are happy to bullshit others, but more careful with your own ass.
There is nothing vibrant whatsoever in AmeriSoc, except perhaps for the pussies and their dildoes. There is nothing vibrant in EuroSoc, except exactly the same.
To declare the dying lands of the West "vibrant" is as mad as describing the death tremors of the Titanic as "vibrant". The only vibrations you're feeling is of a world tearing apart at the seems.

As for that insane riff of yours on "individual freedom". Whoo-ee, you've gone straight to 1984 territory on that one. Versailles does need its jesters.

Arelcao Akleos said...

"Socialist ideology has long disappeared in the US. Kucinich & McMillan are about as electable as Perry, and that is fortunate for all of us."

This sort of joke is very broad, Jester. Akin to ladling on King George III, in 1779, how never has Royalty been so highly esteemed in the American colonies as now, O Sire. The King might be amused, if of sufficiently dull sensibility, but the Jester would be wise to start bringing forth some subtler material.